Want to Be Happy? Be Grateful: TED Talk by David Steindl-Rast

I first posted this wonderful TED Talk by David Steindl-Rast a few years ago. Given the current climate in our country, I thought it would be a good time for a “return engagement.”

A monk and interfaith scholar, Brother David believes that the one thing all humans have in common is the desire to be happy. Given my experience working with folks in all walks of life, I wholeheartedly agree.

In this TED Talk, a case is made for the need to be grateful, in order to be happy, rather than the other way around. What each of us imagines will make us happy might be different, but the desire for the feeling is universal.

How often have you heard someone say, “If only that would happen, I know that I would be happy?” Perhaps as Brother David “strongly suggests,” happiness is born from “the gentle power of gratefulness.” Slow down, look around you.

The assumption is that when we are happy, we are grateful. However, isn’t it possible that those who practice gratitude are the ones who are truly happy?

We all know people who seem to “have everything,” but they often profess to be unhappy and are constantly searching for something more. And, there are people who experience significant misfortune yet they somehow radiate happiness. Perhaps it’s because they feel gratitude for the opportunity to discover unrealized strength and learn important lessons from unexpected situations.

Gratitude can stem from being mindful of and seeing the value of something or some experience — especially when it is not acquired or earned. When we take the time to notice and acknowledge the inherent value in something (even a beautiful sunset), happiness and appreciation can result from our gratitude.

Taking it a little further, by becoming aware that each contains an opportunity to do or experience something, it becomes a gift within a gift.

“We cannot be grateful for everything,” says Brother David. “Certainly not for war or for oppression or for exploitation.” On a personal level, we cannot be grateful for the loss of a friend. However, However, even when confronted with something that is difficult, we can rise to the occasion and learn from the situation and our experience. We are then grateful for the opportunity to enhance our understanding and self-learn from the situation and our experience.

Although the explanation of grateful living seems a bit confusing at certain points, listening to the talk and reading the text is well worth the effort. It takes commitment to pursue a path of grateful living. I recommend it and wholeheartedly believe in its ability to enhance the quality of our lives.

Take a moment to check it out. I think you will feel grateful that you did — and happiness may be close at hand!

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Esther C. Bleuel
MF, MFT, MDR
President and Founder
Esther is dedicated to empowering leaders and teams to improve the quality of their work and interpersonal relationships through the mastery of conversational skills. Contact Esther today for assistance with your tough conversations.

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